Friday, September 6, 2013
Peljesac Peninsula and Korcula

I woke up really missing our dog, Trixie, today. She's at a good kennel, where she gets lots of play time with other small dogs, so I'm sure she's fine, but still... I'm also concerned about our cat, Carlos. He's home alone, with a neighbor coming by every other day to give him food and fresh water, but he's got to be getting lonely (and angry) by now. His usual sitter is laid up with a broken leg, and I know he won't be interacting with the substitute much.

But back to our vacation. Today was a lazier day. We drove north along the Dubrovnik Riviera, across the Peljesac Peninsula, and then took a car ferry to the island of Korcula. It's a winding road along the coast, kind of slow going, but the views are worth it. The 55-mile-long peninsula is covered with ancient city walls, vineyards, and fishing villages.

#########

Fortifications on the Peljesac Peninsula

#########

Sleepy fishing village

#########

Oyster farming on the Adriatic

At the far end of the peninsula, at Orebic, we caught the 12:30 ferry for the 15-minute ride to Domince, on the island of Korcula, another beautiful boat ride on the Adriatic Sea. The price for the car to cross on the ferry did not include a driver, which had to be paid separately. I'm not sure how many people send JUST their car, without accompanying it.

#########

From the ferry to Korcula

#########

Korcula Town

#########

Tommy and Jana together in Croatia!

The town of Korcula was founded by the ancient Greeks, became part of the Roman Empire, and was ruled by the Venetians for four centuries. Marco Polo was born in Korcula in 1254, and, boy, they want you to know it! There's Marco Polo souvenirs everywhere, a Marco Polo museum, and a house where Marco Polo was allegedly born. Unfortunately, the house was built a couple of centuries after his death, so I meet the claim with some skepticism.

#########

Very Venetian

#########

Jana and Marco Polo

Except for one irresistible photo op, we skipped the Marco Polo stuff and sought out the tallest thing in town that we could ascend, the Katedrala Sv. Marka (St. Mark's Cathedral) bell tower. Fantastic views, of course!

#########

Inside Katedrala Sv. Marka

#########

Katedrala bell tower

#########

The Adriatic Sea

#########

Korcula Old Town

The tiny Old Town didn't even take up an hour, so we drove over to Lumbarda, grabbed some snacks, and found a pretty beach, Bilan Zal, on a beautiful cove, where I waded out over the rocks and went swimming. The Adriatic wasn't quite as warm as I thought it should be, but I still enjoyed it. After a picnic and a swim, we returned via ferry to the mainland to check out some of those walls we'd seen earlier.

#########

Bilan Zal beach

Back in Ston, on the Peljesac Peninsula, we stopped at “The Great Wall of Croatia,” over 5 kilometers in circumference, the longest complete fortress system around a town in Europe, and the second longest in the world. The day after tomorrow, they'll be holding the Ston Wall Marathon here. A pity we didn't know ahead of time so we could participate. Ha!

#########

The Great Wall of Croatia in Ston

#########

Just a pinch

It was a stunning drive back to Dubrovnik down the same stretch of coast we'd seen this morning. The coastal islands are beautiful. We pulled over on the approach to Dubrovnik to admire the attractive Franjo Tudjman Bridge, named for the first president of Croatia. We have a partial view of this bridge from our soba, but I wanted a closer look.

#########

Croatian coast

#########

Cute little islets

#########

Franjo Tudjman Bridge

Tonight we found a nice pedestrian area near the beach, just a 10-minute walk from our soba. There were tons of restaurants, all of them serving nearly the exact same things, and lots of souvenir stands and, naturally, hucksters selling excursions to nearby islands. Several expensive hotels are located on this strip as well.

Croatia was playing Serbia in a football (soccer) match tonight, to decide who goes to the World Cup. With the bad blood between the countries, we thought things might get rowdy. The bars and restaurants were crowded with people glued to the screen. Croatia won the game 1 to 0, and no rowdiness was to be seen, just happy cheering.

We wound up eating a couple of blocks off the pedestrian strip at Pizzeria Scala and Mex Cantina. Tom played it safe with spaghetti bolognese, but I couldn't resist ordering a burrito de ranchero. It was good! Hardly Mexican, but tasty, and at least it wasn't spaghetti or pizza. I would have called it maybe a beef and corn wrap. I was able to scare up some Tabasco sauce, so I could at least make it hot. The staff was a little surly and inattentive, but this isn't the only place we ran into that in Croatia. I think they're still learning the tourist biz, in spite of their huge reliance on tourist money.

#########

Interesting shower configuration



Continue to September 7, 2013

Croatia & Slovenia Journal Main Page

Tom Goetz's Homepage

Sign our guestbook

View our guestbook