Monday, October 1, 2012
Boston: The Freedom Trail

A beautiful day today, low 70s and sunny! Again we started our day downstairs at the bacon bar. We ate a little less bacon than yesterday, but still LOTS of bacon. Yeah! That's the way to start a day!

We drove to Wonderland Station, the side mirror still gamely hanging on, took the Blue Line to Government Center, then switched to the Green Line E Branch and rode out to the Museum of Fine Arts. We had a hot lead on some giant metal baby heads on display behind the museum and just couldn't miss seeing (and posing with) them!

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Jana and "Night"

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Tom and "Day"

After fun-with-baby-heads time, we walked over to the Prudential Building and visited the Prudential Sky Observatory, on the 50th floor. We got there at 1:20, just in the nick of time, because, unbeknownst to us until we arrived, they were closing the observatory for the day for a private function at 2:00. We had great views of most of Boston, except for the direction that's blocked by the taller John Hancock Building. It's always interesting to see the aerial view of a place.

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From the Prudential Sky Observatory

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Boston Harbor Islands

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Fenway Park and the Charles River

We spent the rest of the day on The Freedom Trail, a 3-mile walk along the path of some of the oldest locations from America's founding. Starting at Boston Common and ending at Bunker Hill, a painted red line on the sidewalk leads past 16 historic landmarks. I won't mention them all. For a description of each site along the trail, see this website.

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Frog fishing in Boston Common

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Massachusetts State House

Granary Burying Ground, founded in 1660, is the third oldest cemetery in Boston and the final resting place of Paul Revere, Samuel Adams, John Hancock, and the victims of the Boston Massacre. The cemetery has 2,345 graves, but historians estimate as many as 5,000 people are buried there.

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Granary Burying Ground

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Paul Revere, 1734-1818

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Samuel Adams, 1722-1803

King's Chapel and Burying Ground, founded in 1630, is the oldest cemetery in Boston and contains the remains of the first governor of Massachusetts, John Winthrop, and the first woman to step foot off the Mayflower, Mary Chilton.

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King's Chapel Burying Ground

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John Winthrop, 1588-1649

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America's oldest tavern, established 1796

Old North Church is Boston's oldest standing church, erected in 1723. This is where the famous “One if by land, two if by sea” lanterns were hung on April 18, 1775, signaling to the patriots that the British would be arriving for what would become the Battle of Lexington via the “sea” - actually, the Charles River. This was a highlight of the Freedom Trail for us, along with the U.S.S Constitution and the burying grounds.

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Old North Church

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Inside Old North Church

The Old North Church was our last stop of the day. We walked across the Charlestown Bridge, past the Constitution, to Pier 3, where we caught the ferry back to Boston just in time for sunset. We caught the Blue Line at Aquarium Station and returned to the hotel at 7:30.

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U.S.S. Constitution at sunset

The closest restaurant to our hotel was an Uno Chicago Grill, right next door. I had rattlesnake pasta (penne pasta with spicy alfredo sauce and chicken), and Tom had a sirloin. Hit the spot after all the walking!

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Patriotic doormat - Don't tread on it

Continue to October 2, 2012

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